LOBBY ACTIVISM EVENT

Beyond the WC sessions, meetings, and events that reside within the formal protocol of the NAEA, the Lobby Activism event serves as an informal forum for personal as political discussion and/action.

Significant aspects of the Lobby Activism event include self-introductions to someone you have never spoken to before, creative prompts for small group discussion about current issues, and human mic amplification as public performance in the hotel lobby. The “speak-out” affirmation of our beliefs and actions is recorded, transcribed, and posted with photographs on this site. Karen Keifer-Boyd has facilitating the Lobby Activism event since she and Read Diket introduced the first Lobby Activism at NAEA in New Orleans in 2008.

DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOBBY ACTIVISM CONNECTED TO THE UPCOMING BOOK, INCLUDING CALLS FOR CHAPTERS, CAN BE FOUND AT http://judychicago.arted.psu.edu/lobby-activism/

2017

PAST LOBBY ACTIVISM EVENTS

Please click on the links for transcripts of the 2013 2011 2010 2009 Lobby Activism events, and notes from the 2008 event.

A summary of past events conveys the NAEA WC’s resolve to identify current injustice and collectively work to eradicate discrimination. Each year our attendance at these Lobby Activism events has increased, with more than 75 participants in attendance at recent Lobby Activism events.

Questions/Prompts for Lobby Activism Events:

2016: What is feminist leadership in art education?
2015: How do you (re)deSIGN gender codes in your teaching, art, and life?
2014: Speak Truth to Power
2013: What are my personal responsibilities and our collective responsibilities to end violence?
2012: “What do you believe is critical to lobby for in 2012″
2011: “A Time When … ”
2010: “What is the Image of a Feminist in the Field of Art Education Today?”
2009: “Enacting Change: What We Can Learn From Each Other? ”
2008: Collaborative JAE publication: “Vote 2008: What Should an Art Educator Do?”

2016 CHICAGO: FEMINIST LEADERSHIP IN ART EDUCATION

2016

2015 New ORLEANS: (RE)DESIGN GENDER CODES

Beyond the WC sessions, meetings, and events that reside within the formal protocol of the NAEA, the Lobby Activism event serves as an informal forum for personal as political discussion and/action. Held the first evening of the NAEA Convention in the hotel lobby, people have gathered since 2008. Prior to the event, a thematic prompt is discussed and developed by members of the NAEA WC executive board and others who contribute ideas.
Tthe 2015 Lobby Activism event theme is"(re)design Gender Codes." It was held on Thursday, March 26 from 6:00-7:00 p.m. in the LOBBY at the HEADQUARTER HOTEL: HILTON New Orleans.

Process:

1. After an introduction to the Lobby Activism by Karen Keifer-Boyd, the event begins with talking with another participant who you have never talked with before. Introduce yourself.

2. Next, take about 5 minutes to use the images, pattern pieces, and drawing tools to respond to the prompt: How do you (re)deSIGN gender codes in your teaching, art, and life?
Forms of gender identity that, by design, resist the man/woman binary are unimaginable to many people. As Judith Butler (2004) puts it, "To find that you are fundamentally unintelligible (indeed, that the laws of culture and language find you to be an impossibility) is to find that you have not yet achieved access to the human, to find yourself speaking only and always as if you were human, but with the sense that you are not because the norms by which recognition takes place are not in your favor" (p. 30). [Butler, J. (2004). Undoing gender. New York City, NY: Routledge.]

3. Form small groups of 3 to 5 people. Share what you made and discuss. By 6:40 p.m. each group shares with the larger group a summary of what you made and discussed.

4. In the final 20 minutes of the Lobby hour, use the human mic practice to amplify what is said as each group speaks truth to power. As the group members speak all nearby repeat what is said in unison. The speaker needs to say a few words and then stop so the group can repeat in unison making soft voices audible, filling the Lobby.

2015 Lobby Session

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE 2015 LOBBY SESSION, PLEASE DOWNLOAD THIS DOCUMENT HERE

2014 SAN DIEGO: SPEAK TRUTH TO POWER

Speak Truth to Power” is a phrase adopted by or applied to those who challenge dominant forces—namely, patriarchy and capitalism.

2014 Lobby participants spoke truth to power by writing or drawing on strips of fabric then pinning the message on either an artist’s apron or academic gown. A human mic practice amplified the group speaker, speaking truth to power.

The artist apron symbolizes feminist power. While aprons have been associated with housework, the artists’ work apron symbolizes both the intellectual work and labor of artistic production. The academic gown symbolizes patriarchal power, and the hierarchies within educational institutions that often run counter-productive to creating equitable and just teaching, learning, and working environments. Read about this process in this PDF file.

2013 FORT WORTH: What are my personal responsibilities and our collective responsibility to end violence?

Small groups formed to share materials and create torn paper and mixed media collages while reflecting on the prompt. Conversation began when each glued their work onto a shared base.

Kay, L., & Arnold, A. (2014). Order from CHAOS: An arts-based approach to counteract trauma and violence. Art Education,67(3), 31-36. 

2012 NEW YORK: What do you believe is critical to lobby for in 2012?

In response to the prompt, more than 60 participants formed groups and each of the five groups created posters.

2011 SEATTLE: A Time When …

At the 2011 WC Lobby session, the 36 participants responded to the prompt: A Time When ..." A transcription of the 2011 session is linked here with permissions granted by the participants.About 50 people assembled to share personal experiences as possible pedagogical or collective actions. Small groups engaged in open-ended discussion to translate personal experiences into possible pedagogical or political actions, and then shared with the full group.Themes emerged such as feminization of art education, gender inequity, reinventing self, and enacting beliefs.

2010 BALTIMORE: What is the Image of a Feminist in the Field of Art Education Today?

The 2010 Lobby Session extended the “Survey of Art Educators’ Perceptions of and Relationship to Feminism.” The purpose of this survey is to learn of art educators' perceptions of and relationship to feminism in their work in the field of art education today. What are the reasons that art educators identify with or reject feminism?

Of the 123 respondents to the survey, of which 104 identified as women, 100 reported that they had experienced gender discrimination. A transcript of the lobby session responses is linked here as a PDF.

Survey of Art Educators' Perceptions of and Relationship to Feminism

The purpose of this survey is to learn of art educators' perceptions of and relationship to feminism in their work in the field of art education today. What are the reasons that art educators identify with or reject feminism? What are the differences of ideology and teaching practices between those who consider themselves to be feminists and those who don't?

This survey question was also the focus of the 2010 NAEA WC lobby session, facilitated by Karen Keifer-Boyd, Read Diket, and Joanna Rees, in which current, previous, and future NAEA Women's Caucus (WC) members, as well as those who do not intend to join the NAEA WC, engaged in a dialogue on the meaning, practices, and rejection of feminism in art education. If you missed the 2010 lobby session in Baltimore, a transcript of the lobby session is linked here with permission to publish on the NAEA WC website by participants included on this document. Presentation of the survey findings were at NAEA 2011 in Seattle and are being prepared for publication.

The pool of survey participants included individuals throughout the spectrum of art education including but not limited to pre-service teachers in art education certification programs and/or art education graduate programs in higher education; prek-12 art teachers; museum art educators; art educators, researchers, and administrators in higher education; school district art specialists and administrators; and members of the National Art Education Association (NAEA) and the International Society for Education through the Arts (InSEA). The survey closed on July 1, 2010, but is still available to see the questions at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GBQV8Z6

An invitation to participate in the survey questionnaire was distributed online through the NAEA Women’s Caucus website (http://naeawc.net) and NAEA WC FaceBook page, the journal of Visual Culture & Art Education (http://www.emitto.net/visualculturegender), the NAEA higher education, regional, caucuses, and all NAEA listservs; and through the NAEA Student Chapter at

Art Educators Perceptions of and Relationship to Feminism Survey

  1. What is your educational background and highest level of education attained?

  2. What is your job title or brief description of your current or recent employment?

  3. What is your age?

  4. What is your gender?

  5. Have you ever studied gender issues in your educational background? If you answered “yes” please explain the context and institutional setting.

  6. What is a feminist to you?

  7. What does feminism mean to you?

  8. Do you consider yourself to be a feminist?

  9. Do you feel the study of feminism and gender is valid in art education?

  10. What gender-related issues would you like to see researchers study in art education?

  11. Have you ever been discriminated against because of your gender?

  12. Have you ever tried to bring attention to gender issues through your pedagogy/research?If, you answered “yes” can you please indicate how gender is incorporated into your pedagogy/research?

  13. Are you a member of NAEA Women’s Caucus or any other gender related lobbying groups/coalitions?

  14. Please draw a picture or submit a jpeg of your image of a feminist.

 

2009 MINNEAPOLIS: Enacting Change: What We Can Learn From Each Other?

A suggestion from the 2008 lobby session for the Women’s Caucus to organize mentor relationships was the topic in 2009.

Enacting Change: What can we learn from each other?

A group of 31 NAEA Women's Caucus members gathered from 5-6 p.m. in the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel lobby to review the mission of the Women's Caucus with the following questions:

Some people have been involved with the Women's Caucus for a long time, and others are fairly new, or have not been involved for awhile. What can we learn from each other? What would you like to ask of each other? What do you think the role of the Women's Caucus is? What is it that we would like to see as our mission?

How do feminists view "rules" and "boundaries" across cultural difference and socio-political hierarchies intended to maintain order?

When are rules a matter of state, and when do these allude to human relationships of a global nature?

Does the Women's Caucus need a collective identity (e.g., a construct of "women") or mission or coalition for socio-political mobilization?


Current, previous, and future NAEA Women's Caucus members were encouraged to invite another person just met at NAEA to a dialogue about enacting change. Questions posed were: What are issues you would like to hear others' experiences about or would like to share? How do feminists view "rules" and "boundaries" across cultural difference and socio-political hierarchies intended to maintain order? When are rules a matter of state, and when do these allude to human relationships of a global nature? Does the Women's Caucus need a collective identity (e.g., a construct of "women") or mission or coalition for socio-political mobilization?

Read responses to what the participants wanted to hear about each other’s experiences in the transcript of 2009 session linked here

2008 NEW ORLEANS: “Vote 2008: What Should an Art Educator Do?”

Organized by the NAEA Women's Caucus, a group of 16 art educators met at NAEA in New Orleans in 2008 to discuss relevant issues that build on the past, are of the present, and look to the future. Participants collaborated in a response to the prompt for a strategic essay published in the Journal of Art Education (Copyright July 2008. Used with permission of the National Art Education Association).

VISUAL DOCUMENTATION OF LOBBY ACTIVISM EVENTS

 


2015